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Thursday 18 October 2018
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The Most Haunted Places in Los Angeles

If you’d like to make contact with the other side, there are plenty of haunted locations throughout the L.A. area that you can access legally. For a little taste of paranormal activity, visit one of these historic L.A. landmarks.

Los Angeles is full of haunted places, but you can’t access most of its murder mansions, deathbeds, hotels-turned-condos, or abandoned hospitals without trespassing, risking fines, or worse yet — imprisonment. But if you’d like to make contact with the other side, there are plenty of haunted locations throughout the L.A. area that you can access legally (some with only minor finagling).

Maybe you’ve been mingling with the ghosts at some of these places this whole time, but never thought twice about that flicker of light in your peripheral view, or the shadow that seemed to disappear. For a little taste of paranormal activity, visit one of these historic L.A. landmarks and be reminded that you are not alone — even when you’re by yourself.

El Pueblo de Los Angeles
Supernatural spirits abound where the city of L.A. started: at El Pueblo de Los Angeles and its immediate surrounding area. Because this area was essentially the original town square before moving a few blocks west, it was also the town gallows and the site of public hangings and their hanging trees. Some of them occurred directly in front of City Hall, which seems bedeviled by a ghost or two. Security cameras often pick up an image of someone walking around locked offices at night, but when guards go to investigate, they find nothing. When they return to their night shift station, they frequently hear footsteps following them.

Los Angeles was once a dangerous, violent place to live, filled with gunfire and murder. The lawless and the pious were forced to coexist in the establishment of a new sprawling metropolis. At El Pueblo, early adobes were torn down, and the remains of more than 100 people were improperly excavated and relocated from the first cemetery at El Pueblo, next to La Placita church. The area where Union Station now stands, and directly adjacent to it, was not only the site of Old Chinatown but also the infamous and horrific Chinese Massacre of 1871, the largest mass lynching in American history. For a more lighthearted encounter, take your French Dip to one of the upstairs dining rooms at Philippe The Original, where the ladies of the former bordello are said to linger.

El Pueblo de Los Angeles

Supernatural spirits abound where the city of L.A. started: at El Pueblo de Los Angeles and its immediate surrounding area. Because this area was essentially the original town square before moving a few blocks west, it was also the town gallows and the site of public hangings and their hanging trees. Some of them occurred directly in front of City Hall, which seems bedeviled by a ghost or two. Security cameras often pick up an image of someone walking around locked offices at night, but when guards go to investigate, they find nothing. When they return to their night shift station, they frequently hear footsteps following them.

Los Angeles was once a dangerous, violent place to live, filled with gunfire and murder. The lawless and the pious were forced to coexist in the establishment of a new sprawling metropolis. At El Pueblo, early adobes were torn down, and the remains of more than 100 people were improperly excavated and relocated from the first cemetery at El Pueblo, next to La Placita church. The area where Union Station now stands, and directly adjacent to it, was not only the site of Old Chinatown but also the infamous and horrific Chinese Massacre of 1871, the largest mass lynching in American history. For a more lighthearted encounter, take your French Dip to one of the upstairs dining rooms at Philippe The Original, where the ladies of the former bordello are said to linger.

Colorado Street Bridge

Any place with the nickname “Suicide Bridge” has got to be haunted, right? Sure, most of the troubled souls who jumped off the 150-foot Colorado Street Bridge in Pasadena did so during the Great Depression, which had the highest rate of suicide than any other period in recorded history. But even in recent years, the precipice attracts about a dozen jumpers a year. Neither spiked barriers nor signs declaring “There Is Hope” have completely thwarted the suicidal tendencies of the bridge’s visitors, though some would-be jumpers have been discouraged from their attempts by rescue workers arriving at the scene just in time. It still has a pretty sinister — and haunted — reputation. There was even a baby who was thrown off the bridge by her mother, who then followed with a flying leap. The mother died, but the baby survived, her fall broken by tree branches.

Despite its grisly history, walking and driving across this civil engineering landmark is a joy. It was built as a “work of art,” and hasn’t lost its appeal in the century since its completion. Eleven Beaux Arts arches, constructed out of 11,000 cubic yards of steel-reinforced concrete, rise up over the Arroyo Seco, rounding the ravine at a fifty-degree angle. You’re just as likely to encounter restless spirits down below as up above, so take in the view from the Arroyo trail underneath the bridge as well. But if you visit at night, be prepared for the lights to go out. Is it the work of the Woman in White, or just faulty electrical wiring? You be the judge.

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